Our Orbit Ever After Panelists (l-r): Doug Millard, Jamie Stone, Helen Keen and Neil Denny.
Our Orbit Ever After Panelists (l-r): Doug Millard, Jamie Stone, Helen Keen and Neil Denny.

ORBIT EVER AFTER WEEKEND


11 March 2014

On the weekend of the first of March we had two events to celebrate Jamie Stone's BAFTA nominated short Orbit Ever After - a panel and discussion with leading space experts, and a kids filmmaking workshop.

Three cosmonauts go into space at our Kid's Filmmaking Workshop for Orbit Ever After
Three cosmonauts go into space at our Kid's Filmmaking Workshop for Orbit Ever After

Saturday 1st March

In our panel and screening on Saturday, we heard stories from the history and future of space-travel from experts Helen Keen, Doug Millard, Neil Denny, and Orbit Ever After’s director Jamie Stone.

Jamie Stone’s Orbit Ever After, set many generations away, is the story of a family cooped together aboard a small, crowded, and slightly dysfunctional spaceship, to Jamie, these ramshackle worlds feel familiar; ‘ Orbit Ever After is essentially set a small village in Scotland, in space. There’s still a fork you need to twist to make the radio come on, but this time it’s the anti-gravity machine.’ One audience member was intrigued by the array of farm animals that lived on board Nigel’s ship, however, this wasn’t the first idea that was previously imagined; ‘Before we decided to have sheep and chickens on board, we imagined a twenty foot long cow with thirteen pairs of udders.’ Logistically this might have not been possible in the film, but it’s certainly an idea to toy with as we start to think about living in space.

On our panel of experts was Doug Millard, curator of space at the Science Museum, who talked about the realities of being on board a spacecraft; ‘Our bodies are designed for this planet, and aren’t designed for space or to cope with zero gravity, so we’ll need to learn how to adapt.’ Before permanent life is achievable in orbit, we’ll need to spend years learning about what we’ll need to adapt to, something cosmonauts and astronauts have been researching for decades. With Helen Keen and Neil Denney, the panellists shared their favourite stories of space travel, including Russia’s Mars 500 project, the first woman in space Valentina Tereshkova and the mission to save Salyut 1, the first ever space station.

What was evident in the panel was the importance of keeping astronauts psychologically happy, as what was found to be important in the Mars 500 project was allowing astronauts the ability to record their thoughts and make art. Being cooped up with the same person for months, perhaps years, can be tough, quoting Valery Ryumin, Helen Keen ended on this slightly more macabre thought; ‘All the conditions for murder are met if you lock two men in a cabin together for two months.’

Sunday 2nd March

On Sunday we welcomed Videopia to Lighthouse, where we spent the day turning our basement and digital lounge into a fully-fledged film set in order to make a spin-off of Orbit Ever After with eight to fourteen year olds. Everyone got fully stuck in, contributing to the soundtrack, the costumes and most importantly, the film itself. Here’s the space epic that our twenty cosmonauts made with us:

We’ve also got some great photos from the day over on our flickr page.


Share


Subscribe

Join our e-mailing list and be kept up to date with all of our news & activity.