Rod Patterson talks to the BBC about sharing his memories of World War II for Lives at War, Lighthouse, 19 September 2011.
Rod Patterson talks to the BBC about sharing his memories of World War II for Lives at War, Lighthouse, 19 September 2011.

BBC News Film Lives at War - our new online game


19 September 2011

It's been an exciting day at Lighthouse, with the BBC filming our online game, Lives at War, which launches today. By Honor Harger

A still from the Lives at War online game
A still from the Lives at War online game

Today we are launching our new online game made for young people. Lives at War animates the dramatic history of Brighton during World War II, bringing the past vividly to life.

To mark the launch, the BBC are at Lighthouse interviewing some of the inspiring older people, whose stories and memories made the game into the rich narrative experience that it is. They’re also talking to the students from Longhill School who helped create the game, together with our collaborators, Corporation Pop

The immersive online game is set in Brighton in the 1940s. The virtual world uses game mechanics to draw players in to the lives and experiences of air‐raid survivors. Each player chooses an avatar through which to explore the world. Much of the content of the game was developed with a group of school children from Longhill, working with older people from Brighton who remember the war. Together they have visited museums, galleries and archives, participated in creative workshops, and investigated artifacts and archive films from Screen Archive South East.

Lives at War is built using the game engine, Unity3D, a powerful tool for creating video game environments, architectural visualizations, and interactive media installations. Using Unity3D enabled the developers to give the game stunning visual depth and excellent interactive features.

We’ve been working on this for well over a year, as part of our Past Present project, supported by Digital Film Archive Fund and the Heritage Lottery Fund. Whilst primarily designed as a teaching tool to help secondary school children learn about life on the Home Front during World War II, the game will have appeal to anyone curious, and we hope you’ll check it out.

We are tremendously grateful to Jamie Wyld from our team, who directed the project, Juliette Buss, who coordinated the project and made the amazing resource pack for teachers and filmmaker, Annis Joslin who worked with the students right the way through.

We hope you an make it along to the launch tonight.
But if you can’t, please do tune into the 6 o’clock news on BBC One this evening.

And have a play of the game and let us know what you think!
Play the game


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